I have recently been interviewed by Thinkers360 about my work on innovative approaches to airline leadership and management. This interview has now been published and can be viewed at


While decisions about whether or not airline mergers are an existential necessity are still in the air, it’s time to take a deeper look at their shadow side, to understand how they touch the lives of employees and passengers, and what is their impact on cost and service quality.

On Sunday 9th April 2017, Doctor Dao, United Airlines’ passenger, was violently dragged out from his seat just before the departure of his flight UA3411 from Chicago to Louisville. He was chosen to leave the plane against his will despite his claims that he was needed at a Louisville hospital. The…


“The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think and act anew” -Abraham Lincoln

Just over a year ago airlines stepped into 2020 ready to be bigger and better than their competitors, buy more fuel efficient aircraft, fly more — even to busiest airports, carry more passengers with more seats in the cabin, increase retail revenue to compensate for higher costs of their operation, and hope for a more profitable year ahead. …


Have you ever asked someone who doesn’t know much about your business, even a child, how they see the solution to the problem you’ve been stuck on for some time? The chances are that their uncluttered, freer thinking will resonate more closely with the right answer. You may be surprised what they can come up with.

The only effort you have to make is to explain your big problem in a simple way so that even a child can understand it. The effort put in simplifying it will often present you with the answer you were eagerly searching for, but couldn’t hear it from the noise of cluttered data and other unnecessary inputs.


While the decisions about whether or not airline mergers are an existential necessity are still in the air, it’s time to take a deeper look at their shadow side, to understand how they touch the lives of employees and passengers, and what is their impact on cost and service quality.

On Sunday 9th April 2017, Doctor Dao, United Airlines’ passenger, was violently dragged out from his seat just before the departure of his flight UA3411 from Chicago to Louisville. He was chosen to leave the plane against his will despite his claims that he was needed at a Louisville hospital…


It is no wonder that Southwest is among the only three (all low-cost) airlines that retained investment-grade ratings from S&P Global Ratings, after the credit rating agency downgraded a host of carriers and slowed the pace of its air travel recovery forecast. In recently published report, S&P analysts said that superior ratings come from the low-cost model, “robust liquidity”, and greater relative exposure to healthier short-haul and leisure markets.

What these kind of ratings don’t tell us is that the superior ratings come mostly from immeasurable values which are beyond hard facts, things that drive sustainable growth and success, like…


Predicting the company’s future has never been trickier than today. At the time of sudden, and widespread changes in operational environment, particularly in times of deeper crises, traditional company reports and the way the information is organised cease to be useful. And because organisations continue to shape their decisions around this kind of information, they often unknowingly expose their businesses to higher levels of risk and uncertainty. This is how even predictable situations become unpredictable.

Companies that can make distinction between risk and uncertainty usually perform better than others. …


‘In a competitive market, if you do the work to lower your price by 10%, your market share grows.

If you dig in deep, analyse, reengineer and make thoughtful changes, you can lower your price another 10%. This leads to an even bigger jump in market share.

The third time (or maybe the fourth, or even before then), you only achieve a 10% savings by cutting safety, or quality, or reliability. You cut corners, certainly.

The last 10% costs your workers the chance to make a decent living, it costs your suppliers the opportunity to treat their people with dignity…


Every decision we make shapes our future and future of our organisation. We may not be aware of this because we are conditioned by traditional practices which are obscuring our views of interconnected reality. The bigger and more complex our company, the less competent we become, and our business more vulnerable to even the smallest unforeseen disturbances. We are suffering from the pike syndrome.

Still we continue to believe that we are in control of our business by optimising parts of the system, summing up the results, and applying the step-by-step approach to resolve complex nonlinear problems. …


My interview with Sergio Martins, Director Air Traffic Management — Latin America, Saab Group

Major hub airports are running out of capacity needed to meet the growing demand for air travel, and many others are facing the same problem at their busiest times. And still, traffic growth at capacity constrained airports continues, accelerating the risks of disruptions with far reaching consequences on airlines, passengers, environment, and on the safety of air travel. …

Jasenka Rapajic

Challenging conventional practices by thinking and managing anew. Offering a modern approach to decision making in airline industry.

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